10A.3
Microphysics data obtained by the DC-8 during GRIP in relation to near-coincident radar profiles of deep convection

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Wednesday, 18 April 2012: 2:00 PM
Microphysics data obtained by the DC-8 during GRIP in relation to near-coincident radar profiles of deep convection
Champions DE (Sawgrass Marriott)
Edward Zipser, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; and A. Heymsfield, G. Heymsfield, R. Rogers, and S. Braun

Among the great potential advantages of the close cooperation between the GRIP, IFEX, and PREDICT projects during the hurricane season of 2010 is the opportunity to place data obtained by one aircraft in context provided by data obtained from other aircraft. Cloud microphysics data from the NASA DC-8 are of high quality, and here we seek near-coincident radar data from the tail Doppler radar on the NOAA WP-3Ds and from the HIWRAP radar on the NASA Global Hawk. In addition, we have the data from the NASA JPL APR-2 radar data on board the DC-8 available below the aircraft. Despite the excellent collaboration between all 3 science teams, there are not many “perfect” coincidences. This is a first look at some of the best available cases. They include hurricane Karl near 2030 UTC on September 16 when NOAA 42 and the Global Hawk made a west-to-east pass across the eye just a few minutes apart. About 5 additional opportunities are examined in Hurricane Earl and in pre-Karl on September 12. One of the objectives is to understand better how the ice particle size distributions and habits may be related to the elapsed time since the region sampled was in a strong convective core.