J20.6
Research and innovation transition team: facilitating transitions into operations

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Tuesday, 25 January 2011: 4:45 PM
Research and innovation transition team: facilitating transitions into operations
615-617 (Washington State Convention Center)
Douglas Hilderbrand, NOAA/NWS, Silver Spring, MD
Manuscript (265.3 kB)

In March 2009, the National Weather Service (NWS) Office of Science & Technology (OST) established a team focused on improving the productivity of research and innovation transitions into operations. The Research and Innovation Transition Team (RITT) has since assisted with several projects, some now completed and others close to completion, all the while facilitating in the planning and monitoring of the NWS transition portfolio. The RITT collaborates with two major groups: research partners (e.g., Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research) and NWS regional headquarters and local weather forecast offices working on innovation projects. There is an increasing focus on transitions from non-traditional service areas, such as ecosystem forecasting and climate decision support, as well as new dissemination methods (e.g., mobile devices) to NWS core partners.

One specific objective of the RITT is to improve the communication between the NWS and other NOAA line offices, but also within the NWS on what local innovation activities need planning to ensure transition success into operations. Communication efforts include (1) a monthly forum teleconference linking NWS central and regional headquarters, local forecasters, and other NOAA line offices, (2) a 3-day NOAA Technology Summit held every fall bringing together NOAA research labs and NWS operational organizations, other sister agencies in the Federal government, and private sector vendors, and (3) the development of a cross-line office project database. This AMS presentation will identify lessons learned, significant efficiency gains in policy and process, and challenges to successful transitions that still exist.