2014 AMS Washington Forum

- Indicates paper has been withdrawn from meeting
- Indicates paper is an Award Winner

Tuesday, 1 April 2014

7:30 AM-8:00 AM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Breakfast
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

8:00 AM-8:35 AM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Session 1
Call to Order and Welcome
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
  8:00 AM
Call to Order -- BEED Chair, Shawn Miller

  8:05 AM
Welcome -- by AMS President, Bill Gail

  8:10 AM
Remarks about CWCE -- by CWCE Commissioner, Mary Glackin

  8:20 AM
Remarks about CWCE Re-organization, by CWCE Past Commissioner, Matt Parker

  8:30 AM
Remarks about BEC -- by BEC Chair, Betsy Weatherhead

8:35 AM-10:05 AM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Panel Discussion 1
Leveraging the Enterprise: Strengthening Our Value to Society
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Jacqui Jeras, Good Morning Washington, WJLA-TV

The increasing pace of science and technology continues to accelerate capabilities in the atmospheric and hydrologic disciplines. As an outgrowth of public and private-sector investment in weather, climate, and hydrology, new and innovative means have evolved to acquire, integrate, and communicate critical weather, water, climate knowledge and warning information to the public based on these technological achievements. Like the Fair Weather: Effective Partnerships in Weather and Climate Services report that was published in 2003, recent studies by the National Academy of Sciences, the National Research Council, the National Academy for Public Administration, and the NOAA-commissioned JPSS Gap Mitigation: Analysis of Alternatives report, provide insights on the health and vitality of the Enterprise. These reports show that federal agencies working with their Enterprise partners can produce well-formulated strategies to directly return societal benefits. The greatest national good is achieved when all parts of the Enterprise function to serve business, industry and the public. Building on these reports, the 2014 AMS Washington Forum highlights the Enterprise’s considerable advances in shared research, technology development, observations, data sources, social science research and improved end-user access of shared resources and their benefit to society.
 
Robert Baron
Robert Baron, President and CEO, Baron Services, Inc., Huntsville, AL

Handout (10.3 MB)

 
Belay B. Demoz
Belay B. Demoz, Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Howard University, Washington, DC

Handout (4.7 MB)

 
John Englander
John Englander, President, The Sea Level Institute, Boca Raton, FL

Handout (5.6 MB)

 
Rear Admiral Anita Lopez
Anita Lopez, Rear Admiral, Deputy Director of the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps, Washington, DC

Handout (5.0 MB)

10:05 AM-10:30 AM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Coffee Break
Location: Foyer (AAAS Building)

10:30 AM-11:15 AM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Session 2

11:15 AM-12:00 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Session 3
Sharon Parrott
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum

12:00 PM-1:15 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Lunch & Networking
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

1:15 PM-2:45 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Panel Discussion 2
Commercialization of Weather and Climate Data
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Kevin R. Petty, Vaisala Inc.

Weather and climate observations provide critical information that supports both the research and operational communities. Traditionally, the Federal Government has acted as the primary source for weather and climate data; however, over the past few decades, private sector companies have increasingly played a role in the production and dissemination of these data. The current economic landscape has resulted in an increased focus on more effective, targeted use of available Federal resources. As a result, the Federal Government is under pressure to closely examine and optimize its investment in weather- and climate-related activities, including those associated with development, deployment and operation of observing networks. This may manifest itself in an evolving paradigm where there is more reliance on the private sector for weather and climate data and information. This session will build on previous sessions that have examined the topic of the commercialization of weather and climate data, with a focus on the following: the expansion of commercial data providers, the future role of the government in the deployment and operation of observing systems, and challenges associated with the commercialization of weather and climate data.
 
Neil Jacobs
Neil Jacobs, Panasonic Avionics Corporation, Morrisville, NC

 
Thomas Karl
Thomas R. Karl, Director, NOAA/NCDC, Asheville, NC

Handout (4.6 MB)

 
Jon Kirchner
Jon Kirchner, President, GeoOptics Inc., Gladwyne, PA

 
Glenn Tallia
Glenn Tallia, Section Chief, Office of the General Counsel, NOAA, Silver Spring, MD

Handout (338.8 kB)

2:45 PM-3:15 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Coffee Break
Location: Foyer (AAAS Building)

3:15 PM-4:45 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Panel Discussion 3
Impacts of the Changing Arctic
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Rear Admiral David W. Titley, Professor & Director, Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk, Penn State Univ.

The future of the Arctic involves less ice, more access, and new fisheries, tourism, and shipping as well as oil, gas, and minerals commerce. The AMS Arctic panel will explore the new Arctic regime and speculate on the needs that will arise at the intersection of policy and the weather, water, and climate enterprise. What tools can AMS partnerships offer that people will use to design and operate facilities in the changing weather and climate patterns of the Arctic? What ocean, weather, and climate and environmental observations and monitoring will forecasters and modelers need to predict future arctic conditions and to foresee the Arctic’s impact on the global future? What critical questions do policy-makers need answers for as the United States prepares to chair the Arctic Council in 2015?
 
Bill Eichbaum
Bill Eichbaum, Vice President, Marine and Arctic Policy, World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC

Handout (6.7 MB)

 
Sherri Goodman
Sherri Goodman, General Counsel, SVP, and Chair of the Military Advisory Board of CNA, Alexandria, VA

Handout (3.1 MB)

 
Julia Gourley
Julia Gourley, Senior Arctic Official, US Department of State, Alexandria, VA

 
Rear Admiral Jonathan White
Rear Admiral Jonathan White, Oceanographer, US Navy & Director, Space and Maritime Domain Awareness, Washington, DC

Handout (8.1 MB)

6:00 PM-7:00 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Reception (Cash Bar) -- Marriott Metro Center
Location: Grand Ballroom AB (Washington Marriott at Metro Center)

7:00 PM-9:00 PM: Tuesday, 1 April 2014


Forum Dinner with Speaker, Dr. Antonio Busalacchi, Director, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), University of Maryland
Location: Grand Ballroom AB (Washington Marriott at Metro Center)

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

8:00 AM-8:25 AM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Breakfast
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

8:25 AM-8:30 AM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Call to Order -- by BEED Chair, Shawn Miller
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)

8:30 AM-10:00 AM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Panel Discussion 4
Congressional and Executive Branch Staffers
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Raymond J. Ban, President, Ban & Associates and Consultant, Weather Industry & Government Partnerships, The Weather Company

Panel discussion about legislative and policy directions that affect the US Weather, Water & Climate Enterprise.
 
Fern Gibbons
Fern Gibbons, U.S. Senate - Commerce, Science & Transportation Committee, Washington, DC

 
Sean Houton
Sean Houton, U.S. Senate - Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee , Washington, DC

 
Dan Pearson
Dan Pearson, U.S. House of Representatives - Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Washington, DC

 
Dahlia Sokolov
Dahlia Sokolov, U.S. House of Representatives - Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Washington, DC

 
Clint Woods
Clint Woods, U.S. House of Representatives - Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Washington, DC

10:00 AM-10:30 AM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Coffee Break
Location: Foyer (AAAS Building)

10:30 AM-12:00 PM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Panel Discussion 5
Impacts of Extreme Weather and Climate Events on Health
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: John A. Haynes, Program Manager, Applied Sciences Program, Earth Science Division, NASA

The extent of human health risks from extreme weather and climate events depends not just on exposure to these events, but also on the status of the public health and health care systems, built environment, and natural environment, and on the capacity of individuals and communities to understand the risk, and avoid, prepare for, cope with, and recover from extreme events. The panelists will explore how recent scientific understanding of the magnitude and pattern of possible impacts, and of the effectiveness of measures to communicate and manage risks, can inform local to national policy development.
 
Peter Berry
Peter Berry, Senior Policy Analyst, Climate Change and Health Office, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Handout (10.9 MB)

 
Jose Centeno
Jose Centeno, The Joint Pathology Center, National Capitol Region Medical Directorate, Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic, Joint Base Andrews, MD

Handout (10.2 MB)

 
Terry Keating
Terry Keating, Office or Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC

Handout (1.8 MB)

 
Rebecca Noe
Rebecca S. Noe, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (extreme cold events/public reception and perception of warnings), Atlanta, GA

Handout (1.8 MB)

 
William Solecki
William Solecki, Director, CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities, Professor, City University of New York, New York, NY

Handout (6.0 MB)

12:00 PM-1:30 PM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Lunch & Networking
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

1:30 PM-3:00 PM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Panel Discussion 6
Space Weather Mitigation: Recovery from a Carrington Event
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Christina Cody, Senior Program Officer - Critical Infrastructure, National Assn. of Regulatory Utility Commissions
Chair: Genene Fisher, Senior Advisor for Space Weather, National Weather Service, NOAA

The Committee on the Societal and Economic Impacts of Severe Space Weather Events by the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council published its last Workshop Report in 2008. They said: “The adverse effects of extreme space weather on modern technology -- power grid outages, high-frequency communication blackouts, GPS disruptions of aircraft flight systems, spacecraft anomalies -- are well known and well documented, and the physical processes underlying space weather are also generally well understood. Less well documented and understood, however, are the potential economic and societal impacts of the disruption of critical technological systems by severe space weather,” like having a re-occurrence of the 1859 Carrington Event. Today Americans are familiar with all types of natural hazards and understand how to prepare and mitigate their disastrous effects. The question must be asked if the government exists to safeguard the people, why hasn’t the federal or state government done more to educate and prepare the public for the dangers of space weather that could potentially cripple electrical power systems on Earth? Why haven’t more studies been conducted to examine the socioeconomic impacts of extreme space weather events and develop risk assessment strategies to deal with severe space weather? It’s a matter of probability that we will experience another Carrington event. As today’s presenter, Lika Guhathakurta and her colleague Dan Baker of the University of Colorado asked in a June 17, 2011 New York Times op-ed: "What good are space weather alerts if people don’t understand them and won’t react to them?" This panel will focus not on solar physics or what is a Coronal Mass Ejection, but to have experts discuss how the nation can prepare for an event of this magnitude and what does society do afterwards. How do we recover from another Carrington Event?
 
Madhulika Guhathakurta
Madhulika Guhathakurta, Lead Program Scientist, Living with a Star Program, NASA, Washington, DC

Handout (7.0 MB)

 
William Lapenta
William Lapenta, NOAA/NWS/NCEP, College Park, MD

Handout (6.4 MB)

 
Peter Vincent Pry
Peter Vincent Pry, Task Force on National and Homeland Security, Shelbyville, TN

 
Lisa Wei
Lisa Wei, AER, Lexington, MA

Handout (5.1 MB)

3:00 PM-3:30 PM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Coffee Break
Location: Foyer (AAAS Building)

3:30 PM-5:00 PM: Wednesday, 2 April 2014


Panel Discussion 7
Federal Agency Leads
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Alexander MacDonald, Chief Science Advisor, Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research, & Director, NOAA/ESRL; President-Elect, AMS

Panelists from major federal agencies will each give a 10 minute opening statement that will look ahead, provide updates on current weather, water, and climate programs, and provide insights on new science initiatives and directions. The subsequent session discussion emphasizes topics related to future programs and initiatives that may lead to business or partnership opportunities for AMS Members.
 
John Balbus
John Balbus, Senior Advisor for Public Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD

Handout (9.0 MB)

 
Olivia Barton Ferriter
Olivia Barton Ferriter, U.S. Geological Survey - Acting Associate Director for Office of Budget, Planning, and Integration, Washington, DC

Handout (13.9 MB)

 
Mike Freilich
Michael H. Freilich, Earth Science Division Director, NASA, Washington, DC

Handout (11.8 MB)

 
Louis Uccellini
Louis W. Uccellini, Director, NOAA/NWS, Silver Spring, MD

Handout (7.0 MB)

Thursday, 3 April 2014

8:00 AM-8:25 AM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Breakfast
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

8:20 AM-8:30 AM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Remarks and Call to Order
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
  8:20 AM
Remarks by BGS Chair and Past BEED Chair, Melinda Marquis

  8:25 AM
Remarks by AMS President-Elect, Alexander MacDonald

8:30 AM-10:00 AM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Panel Discussion 8
Some Current Capabilities and Future Plans for Surface Transportation Weather Support
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Paul A. Pisano, Team Leader, Road Weather & Work Zone Management, Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Dept. of Transportation

Last year’s AWF Transportation Session focused on the need for and the importance of improved weather support for surface transportation, since weather usually causes greater overall human and economic impacts to the nation than all of the combined major meteorological events (e.g. hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, etc.), which receive most of the attention and resources; broadly outlined recent studies on developments and potential of new technologies; and described some ideas on future opportunities. In keeping with the theme for this year’s Forum, this session proposes to follow-up on these ideas with a concrete example of a very successful implementation of new mobile observations technology support by the private sector; a discussion of newly developed public sector plans for research, development, and application; and finally a perspective on how the federal government may be of assistance in integrating the new technologies from various sectors and accelerate their use to benefit society.
 
Jim Kolb
Jim Kolb, U.S. House of Representatives - Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Washington, DC

 
Kenneth Leonard
Kenneth Leonard, Director, Intelligent Transportation Systems, Joint Program Office, RITA, USDOT, Washington, DC

Handout (5.1 MB)

 
Bob Moran
Bob Moran, CEO/Founder, Weather Telematics Inc., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Handout (26.6 MB)

 
Andrew Stern
Andrew Stern, Chief Operations Officer, Office of Climate, Water, and Weather Services, NOAA/NWS, Silver Spring, MD

Handout (5.1 MB)

10:00 AM-10:30 AM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Coffee Break
Location: Foyer (AAAS Building)

10:30 AM-12:00 PM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Panel Discussion 9
Water-Energy Nexus
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Angel McCoy, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

In the Water-Energy Nexus session panelists will discuss threats to our nation’s water resources, interagency coordination to address national outcomes for water and energy, advances in offshore renewable energy development, including the challenges and tradeoffs facing the country. Population growth, economic development and the increased demand for energy resources are stressing U.S. and international water supplies perilously to the breaking point. For these reasons, coupled with a changing climate and extreme weather events, there is a need for an integrated approach to science and services for water resources in the energy sector.
 
Kristen Averyt
Kristen B. Averyt, Director, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Handout (27.7 MB)

 
Camille Coley
Camille Coley, Associate Director, Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC), Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL

Handout (3.2 MB)

 
Claudia Copeland
Claudia Copeland, Congressional Research Service, U.S. Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Handout (1.2 MB)

 
Gerald Geernaert
G. L. Geernaert, Director, DOE Biological & Environmental Research (BER) Climate & Environmental Sciences Division (DOE/CESD), Washington, DC

Handout (951.7 kB)

12:00 PM-1:15 PM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Lunch & Networking
Location: Abelson/Haskins (AAAS Building)

1:15 PM-2:45 PM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Panel Discussion 10
Typhoon Haiyan
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum
Moderator: Cory Springer, Director, Weather & Environment Strategic Operations, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp.

Typhoon Haiyan was an unprecedented storm. Making landfall in the Philippines on November 8, 2013 as a Category 5 typhoon, the storm left significant damage in its wake. Additional countries impacted included Vietnam and southern China, as well as Micronesia and Palau. It was the strongest cyclone to hit land in recorded history. While the storm’s 200 mph winds were devastating, it was the two-story-high storm surge that was most destructive - flooding homes, schools, and hospitals. Since 1969, only three storms have had sustained winds close to this magnitude — Hurricane Camille in 1969, Super Typhoon Tip in 1979, and Hurricane Allen in 1980. Typhoon predictions – and related technology – have improved substantially over this time, and the predictions for Haiyan were quite accurate. However, the impacts of this storm were still huge, especially in the Philippines. This panel will examine some of the technologies that assisted with the prediction and response to this storm, and how they compared to what was available in past storms – and explore what should happen next in planning for the next super typhoon like Haiyan. The panel discussion will also address the comparisons in prediction and response to Superstorm Sandy that hit the coast of New Jersey in October 2012.
 
Curt Barrett
Curt Barrett, Consultant to USAID Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), Westminster, MD

Handout (5.6 MB)

 
Nicholas Behnken
Nicholas Behnken, Sr. Technical Representative, Pacific Disaster Center, Kihei, HI

Handout (24.4 MB)

 
Fred Branski
Fred Branski, WMO, President of Commission for Basic Systems, and NWS, International User Requirements Liaison, Silver Spring, MD

Handout (2.1 MB)

 
David Robinson
David A. Robinson, Professor, Rutgers University and NJ State Climatologist, Piscataway, NJ

Handout (3.5 MB)

2:45 PM-3:00 PM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


Session 4
Closing Remarks by the BGS Chair and Past BEED Chair, Melinda Marquis
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)
Host: 2014 AMS Washington Forum

3:00 PM-3:05 PM: Thursday, 3 April 2014


AMS 2014 Washington Forum Adjourns
Location: Auditorium (AAAS Building)