Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy

Program Chair: Stephen Bennett , EarthRisk Technologies

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Saturday, 22 January 2011

7:30 AM-10:00 AM: Saturday, 22 January 2011


Registration for Student Conference and Short Course

Sunday, 23 January 2011

7:30 AM-9:00 AM: Sunday, 23 January 2011


Short Course Registration

12:00 PM-4:00 PM: Sunday, 23 January 2011


WeatherFest

6:00 PM-7:00 PM: Sunday, 23 January 2011


Welcome Reception Honoring Newly Elected Fellows
Location: 4E (Washington State Convention Center)

Monday, 24 January 2011

7:30 AM-5:30 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Registration continues through January 27

8:00 AM-5:30 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Weather Video Preview Theater
Location: 303 (Washington State Convention Center)

9:00 AM-10:30 AM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Panel Discussion
Communicating Weather and Climate
Location: 6AB (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the More Effectively Communicating the Science of Tropical Climate and Tropical Cyclones; the Michio Yanai Symposium; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the 23rd Conference on Climate Variability and Change; the 20th Symposium on Education; the 18th Conference on Planned and Inadvertent Weather Modification; the 16th Conference on Middle Atmosphere; the 15th Symposium on Integrated Observing and Assimilation Systems for the Atmosphere, Oceans and Land Surface (IOAS-AOLS); the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences; the Ninth History Symposium; the 8th Conference on Space Weather; the Seventh Annual Symposium on Future Operational Environmental Satellite Systems; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; the Fifth Conference on the Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data; the 5th Symposium on Lidar Atmospheric Applications; the Fourth Annual CCM Forum; the Third Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions; the Second Aviation, Range and Aerospace Meteorology Special Symposium on Weather-Air Traffic Management Integration; the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; the Second Symposium on Environment and Health; the First Conference on Transition of Research to Operations: Successes, Plans and Challenges; the Special Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python; the Special Symposium on Applications of Air Pollution Meteorology; the IMPACTS: Weather 2010; and the 11th Presidential Forum: Communicating Weather and Climate )
Moderator: Robert T. Ryan, NBC4 TV
Panelists: Thomas E. Skilling, WGN-TV/Chicago Tribune; Claire Martin, CBC News: Weather Centre; Doyle Rice, USA Today; Martin Storksdieck, National Academy of Sciences / National Research Council
  9:00 AM
Panelist: Thomas E. Skilling
Thomas E. Skilling, WGN-TV/Chicago Tribune, Chicago, IL

  9:10 AM
Panelist: Claire Martin
Claire Martin, CBC News: Weather Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada

  9:20 AM
Panelist: Doyle Rice
Doyle Rice, USA Today, Washington, DC

  9:30 AM
Panelist: Martin Storksdieck
Martin Storksdieck, National Academy of Sciences / National Research Council, Washington, DC

Recording files available
Plenary Session
Presidential Forum: Communicating Weather and Climate
Location: 6AB (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the 15th Symposium on Integrated Observing and Assimilation Systems for the Atmosphere, Oceans and Land Surface (IOAS-AOLS); the First Conference on Transition of Research to Operations: Successes, Plans and Challenges; the Fourth Annual CCM Forum; the Special Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python; the Michio Yanai Symposium; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the 23rd Conference on Climate Variability and Change; the 20th Symposium on Education; the 18th Conference on Planned and Inadvertent Weather Modification; the 16th Conference on Middle Atmosphere; the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences; the Ninth History Symposium; the 8th Conference on Space Weather; the Seventh Annual Symposium on Future Operational Environmental Satellite Systems; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; the 5th Symposium on Lidar Atmospheric Applications; the Fifth Conference on the Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data; the Third Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions; the Second Aviation, Range and Aerospace Meteorology Special Symposium on Weather-Air Traffic Management Integration; the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; the Second Symposium on Environment and Health; the More Effectively Communicating the Science of Tropical Climate and Tropical Cyclones; the Special Symposium on Applications of Air Pollution Meteorology; the IMPACTS: Weather 2010; the Events; and the 14th Conference of Atmospheric Science Librarians International )

9:00 AM-11:00 AM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Spouses' Coffee

4:00 PM-5:30 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 1
Communicating with Technology (Themed Joint Session)
Location: 604 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Special Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth History Symposium; the Seventh Annual Symposium on Future Operational Environmental Satellite Systems; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; and the 20th Symposium on Education )
Chair: Rajul Pandya, UCAR
  4:00 PM
J1.1
Integrating air quality tools with the Wildland Fire Decision Support System
Narasimhan Larkin, USDA Forest Service, Seattle, WA; and M. Rorig, T. Strand, T. J. Brown, S. Raffuse, P. Lahm, and T. Zimmerman

  4:15 PM
J1.2
Using YouTube Videos to Communicate Science
Nancy N. Soreide, NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, WA; and T. Nakamura and M. Dunlap
  4:30 PM
J1.3
Commuicating Climate Science fo the General Public
Andrew Freedman, Climate Central, Princeton, NJ; and H. Cullen and M. McGuirk
  4:45 PM
J1.4
Utility of 2D/3D visualization methods in analyzing and disseminating flood information
Jamie L. Dyer, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS; and P. Amburn, D. Reed, and D. Welch
 
J1.5
  5:00 PM
J1.5A

5:30 PM-7:00 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Reception and Exhibits Opening

7:00 PM-8:30 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011

Recording files available
Session
Town Hall Meeting: What do Meteorologists Need to Know about the Energy Industry -- and Vice Versa – to Integrate Weather-Driven Renewable Energy into the Electric Grid?
Location: 615-617 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Town Hall Meetings; and the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy )

As the nation weighs the benefits and costs of various energy sources, and states adopt renewable portfolio standards, electric system operators face significant challenges to integrating weather-driven energy sources. The variable nature of wind and solar energy requires new information and practices for operating our nation’s electric grid. System operators must constantly square the energy supply and demand within a given balancing authority. To ensure a reliable source of electricity, utility companies maintain dispatchable energy reserves, such as coal and natural gas, on-line and running, but at reduced operating levels. Without accurate forecasts of weather-driven renewable energy production, utility companies must maintain an excess number of fossil fuel plants running to ensure it can meet energy demand. More accurate weather forecasts are needed to help utility companies know with greater precision when, where, and how much wind or solar energy can be generated to balance the energy supply with demand. More accurate weather forecasts are required to obtain the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and financial savings derived as a result of using less fossil fuel. Several recent grid integration studies assess the costs, benefits, impacts, and challenges of using larger and larger amounts of variable energy resources, such as wind and solar energy. These reports find that market changes and improved forecasts, in addition to improved transmission resources, are needed to accommodate increasing amounts of renewable energy. Looking to the future, long-term predictions of renewable energy resources are needed to support sound decision making concerning the siting of renewable energy projects and for long-range market planning. In addition, the possibility of using waves, tides, and currents (marine and hydrokinetic energy) and offshore wind to produce electricity calls for increased understanding of these resources and how they could be used in an environmentally sound way. New observations are required to achieve the advances in predictions across a range of time scales to support renewable energy development. This Town Hall Meeting will build upon the work done at several AMS meetings in the last two years and the efforts of the Commission on the Weather and Climate Enterprise and its Renewable Energy Subcommittee to help identify appropriate roles for private industry, academia, and government sectors in developing renewable energy. Effective collaboration among these sectors is essential for integrating large amounts of weather-driven renewable resources into the nation’s energy supply. For additional information, please contact Melinda Marquis (e-mail: Melinda.Marquis@noaa.gov).
  7:15 PM

7:00 PM-9:00 PM: Monday, 24 January 2011


Forecast: Communicating Weather and Climate Art Show

Tuesday, 25 January 2011

8:00 AM-5:30 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


Weather Video Preview Theater
Location: 303 (Washington State Convention Center)

9:00 AM-11:00 AM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


Spouses' Coffee

9:30 AM-6:00 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


Exhibit Hours

11:00 AM-12:00 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


Bernhard Haurwitz Lecture

3:00 PM-3:30 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


Meet the President
Location: 601 (Washington State Convention Center)

6:00 PM-7:30 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011

Recording files available
Session
Town Hall Meeting: Flipping the Switch: The Energy Complex Demystified
Location: 608 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Town Hall Meetings; and the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy )

Weather is a critical driver for the consumption of electricity, natural gas, and heating oil in the United States. Meteorologists in academia, government, and the private weather enterprise all support decision makers across the full breadth of the energy complex. The economic impacts the these weather-related decisions are enormous. For example, U.S. electricity generators save upward of $160 million annually using 24-hour temperature forecasts to improve the mix of generating units that are available to meet electricity demand. Planning decisions for the production, transportation, and marketing of natural gas hinge upon temperature forecasts 1 week to 3 months ahead. The value of weather forecasts for the increased use and integration of weather-dependent renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, has also been recognized by the Department of Energy. Hundreds of meteorologists support the energy complex for commodity trading, infrastructure planning, and utility management in order to meet the nation’s demand to heat and cool our indoor environments. But how does it all actually work? What happens when you flip the switch? This panel of experts will describe how the energy complex functions. How does power flow? What is the nature of energy trading? How do fuel sources differ across various regions of the country? How do oil and natural gas get to your furnace? Answers to these basic questions then lead us to consider the rapid modernization of the energy complex. How will the "smart grid" affect energy planning? How is renewable energy changing the grid? And, of course, how does weather affect energy decision making? It is important within this context to note that the patchwork of regional energy entities and varying regional climate impacts further complicate the relationships between energy supply and weather-driven demand. The objective of this Town Hall Meeting is to provide the AMS community with a better understanding of the energy industry and then open a discussion on the major issues facing weather experts in the energy realm. We will discuss the ongoing and emerging challenges presented by weather and climate. We will conclude with an open forum focusing on two distinct questions for panelists and participants: 1) What do meteorologists need to know from the energy industry? and 2) What does the energy industry need to know from meteorologists? This Town Hall Meeting serves as an introduction to the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy as well as following up on Monday’s Town Hall Meeting discussion on renewable energy For additional information, please contact Stephen Bennett (tel: 858-246-0065; e-mail: stephenbennett@ucsd.edu).
  6:00 PM
How does energy work?
Russell L. Bigley, Xcel Energy, Littleton, CO

7:30 PM-8:30 PM: Tuesday, 25 January 2011


“Energizing” Happy Hour
Location: 605/610 (Washington State Convention Center)

Wednesday, 26 January 2011

8:00 AM-5:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Weather Video Preview Theater
Location: 303 (Washington State Convention Center)

8:30 AM-9:15 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 1
Dollars and Cents: Weather for Energy Markets I
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Mark S. Russo, Chesapeake Energy Corp.
  8:30 AM
1.1
Winter's shorter shadow on natural gas demand
Joshua Darr, Chesapeake Energy, Chicago, IL; and J. Davis and M. Russo
  8:45 AM
1.2
  9:00 AM
1.3
Using Customized Weather Derivatives to Hedge Earnings Volatilities in Energy Markets
Richard Oduntan, Nephila Capital Ltd, Hamilton, Bermuda; and B. Schauble

8:30 AM-10:00 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 3
Risk Communication of Weather and Climate Information (Themed Joint Session)
Location: 611 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; and the Second Symposium on Environment and Health )
Cochairs: Nate Johnson, WRAL-TV; John Sokich, NOAA/NWS
  8:30 AM
J3.1
The Communication of Risk: At the Crossroads of Science, Economics, and Communications
Paul Hettler, California University of Pennsylvania, California, PA; and S. A. Jasko and C. M. Kauffman
  8:45 AM
J3.2
Communicating weather, climate and catastrophe risk and preparedness
Jeanne Salvatore, Insurance Information Institute, New York, NY
  9:15 AM
J3.4
Visualization of slow-developing hazards: Influencing perceptions and behaviors to facilitate adaptation planning
Tim G. Frazier, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID; and F. Murtinho, G. Broad, D. Campbell, P. Howe, and H. Reyes Hernandez

  9:30 AM
J3.5
How do people perceive and respond to flash flood risk and warnings?
Rebecca E. Morss, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and J. K. Lazo, K. Mulder, J. L. Demuth, and A. Bostrom
  9:45 AM
J3.6
Now what do people know about global climate change? A mental models approach
Ann Bostrom, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; and T. W. Reynolds and R. Hudson

9:00 AM-11:00 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Spouses' Coffee

9:15 AM-10:00 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Panel Discussion 1
Dollars and Cents: Weather for Energy Markets (Panel Discussion)
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Moderator: Kevin Stenson, MeteoGroup USA
  9:15 AM
PD1.1
Weather Risk Management and Renewable Energy
Lawrence Heitkemper, MDA Information Systems LLC, Gaithersburg, MD; and C. Hanson and T. Hamilton

10:00 AM-10:30 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Coffee Break

Meet the President

10:00 AM-6:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Exhibit Hours

10:30 AM-11:00 AM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 2
Dollars and Cents: Weather for Energy Markets II
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Russell L. Bigley, Xcel Energy
  10:30 AM
2.1
The value of wind power forecasting
Debra Lew, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO; and M. Milligan and G. Jordan
Manuscript (310.0 kB)

  10:45 AM
2.2
Offshore Wind Energy: Prospects for Florida and the Gulf of Mexico
Mark Powell, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Tallahassee, FL; and S. R. Smith, S. Cocke, and C. Collier

10:30 AM-12:00 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 4
Communicating Climate Change I (Themed Joint Session)
Location: 609 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the 23rd Conference on Climate Variability and Change; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth History Symposium; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; and the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy )
Chair: Susan Solomon, MIT
  10:30 AM
J4.1
  10:45 AM
J4.3
Communicating climate change: from awareness to action
Amy K. Snover, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; and L. C. Whitely Binder, A. F. Hamlet, and J. Littell
  11:15 AM
J4.4
Making climate part of the human world
Simon D. Donner, University of British Colombia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
  11:30 AM
J4.6A
Communicating uncertainty in the IPCC 5th Assessment
Myles R. Allen, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

11:00 AM-12:00 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 3
Weather Fundamentals for Energy Planning: Data and User Groups I
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Catherine A. Finley, WindLogics Inc.
  11:00 AM
3.1
Renewable Energy in a Coastal Domain: Observations and Modeling
Len Pietrafesa, Center for Marine & Wetland Studies, Conway, SC; and P. Gayes, M. Peng, and K. Ma
  11:15 AM
3.2
Comparison and validation of high-resolution techniques for spatial mapping of wind energy resources
Mark T. Stoelinga, 3TIER, Inc., Seattle, WA; and M. F. Garvert, S. J. Eichelberger, and J. McCaa
  11:30 AM
3.3
Assimilation of Real-Time Observations for Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting and Renewable Systems Management
Elena Novakovskaia, Earth Networks, Germantown, MD; and H. Centola and C. Sloop

  11:45 AM
3.4
Maximizing the value of short-term observational data using numerical weather prediction models
Scott J. Eichelberger, 3TIER, Inc., Seattle, WA; and J. McCaa and P. Storck

12:00 PM-1:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Lunch Break

1:30 PM-2:00 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 4
Weather Fundamentals for Energy Planning: Data and User Groups II
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: John Manobianco, AWS Truepower LLC
  1:30 PM
4.1
Observed Impacts of Transient Clouds on Utility-Scale PV Fields
J. Adam Kankiewicz, Clean Power Research, Seattle, WA; and M. Sengupta and D. Moon
  1:45 PM
4.2
Solar variability and its impact on photovoltaic generation
Manajit Sengupta, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO; and R. George

1:30 PM-2:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 5
Communicating Climate Change II (Themed Joint Session)
Location: 609 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the 23rd Conference on Climate Variability and Change; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth History Symposium; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; and the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy )
Chair: Francis W. Zwiers, University of Victoria
  1:30 PM
J4.6
Devils Lake climate, weather, and water decision support system
Fiona Horsfall, NOAA/NWS, Silver Spring, MD; and D. Kluck, M. J. Brewer, M. Timofeyeva, J. Symonds, S. Dummer, and M. Frazier
  1:45 PM
J5.1
  2:00 PM
J5.2
  2:15 PM
J5.4
Turning the tide on climate change
Philippe de Casabianca, Cefic, Brussels, Belgium; and R. Kandel

2:00 PM-2:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 7
Weather and Climate Applications for Energy Decision Support—I
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; and the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences )
Chair: Russell L. Bigley, Xcel Energy
  2:00 PM
J7.1
Operational utilization and evaluation of a coupled weather and outage prediction service for electric utility operations
Lloyd A. Treinish, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; and A. Praino, H. Li, R. Derech, and B. Hertell
  2:15 PM
J7.2
Introducing the Renewable Energy Network Optimization Tool (ReNOT): Part I
Randall Alliss, Northrop Grumann Corporation, Chantilly, VA; and R. Link, D. Apling, M. L. Mason, H. Kiley, G. Higgins, and K. Darmenova

2:30 PM-4:00 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Poster Session 1
Dollars and Cents: Weather for Energy Markets
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
761
 
762
Gene-expression programming—an electrical-load forecast alternative to artificial neural networks
Atoossa Bakhshaii, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; and R. B. Stull

Poster PDF (1.2 MB)

 
763
On the efficiency of solar energy in the tropics
Paul Ruscher, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL

Poster PDF (3.0 MB)

 
764
Establishing the value in day ahead solar power forecasting
Jeff Lerner, 3TIER, Seattle, WA; and E. Grimit, B. Nijssen, and M. Wiley

 
765
Wind farm layout optimization
Jayant R. Kalagnanam, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; and B. Dilkina and L. A. Treinish

Poster PDF (1.0 MB)


Joint Poster Session 1
Weather and Climate Applications for Energy Decision Support
Hosts: (Joint between the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; and the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences )
 
753
Making energy balancing decisions based on very uncertain wind power ramp forecasts
Eric P. Grimit, 3TIER, Inc., Seattle, WA; and K. Larson, J. Lerner, and M. T. Stoelinga

 
754
NASA products to enhance energy utility load forecasting
Erica Zell, Battelle, Arlington, VA; and P. Stackhouse Jr., G. Lough, J. Engel-Cox, A. Carpenter, G. J. Jedlovec, R. Homer, and S. Bliley

 
755
Visualizing wind power forecast performance
Lacey Holland, 3TIER, Seattle, WA; and A. Atkins and C. Teeter

 
Poster 756 has been moved to oral presentation J9.1A

 
758
Applications of the Renewable Energy Network Optimization Tool (ReNOT) for use by Wind & Solar Developers: Part II
Randall Alliss, Northrop Grumann Corporation, Chantilly, VA; and R. Link, D. Apling, H. Kiley, M. Mason, E. Martin, and G. Higgins
Manuscript (1.9 MB)

Poster PDF (2.0 MB)

 
759
Simulating Photovoltaic Array Performance with Solar Radiations Observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet
Nicholas A. Engerer, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and M. L. Morrissey

Poster PDF (2.1 MB)

 
Poster 760 now Poster 263A


Poster Session 2
Weather Fundamentals for Energy Planning: Data and User Groups
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
766
Performance of a wind-profiling LIDAR in the region of wind turbine rotor disks
Matthew L. Aitken, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO; and M. E. Rhodes and J. K. Lundquist

Poster PDF (870.4 kB)

 
767
An evaluation of different data mining methods for forecasting wind farm power
Gerry Wiener, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and J. M. Pearson, B. Lambi, and W. Myers

Poster PDF (531.9 kB)

 
768
Simulating Wind Power Density around Buildings for Siting
Sue Ellen Haupt, Penn State Univ., University Park, PA; and S. W. Stewart, J. A. Cole, F. J. Zajaczkowski, and K. J. Schmehl
Manuscript (659.3 kB)

 
769
Simulating time-series winds using genetic programming
Ethan Cook, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and M. L. Morrissey and J. S. Greene

 
771
A U.S. Wind Climatology: new tools to monitor wind trends across the contiguous United States
Jake Crouch, NOAA/NCDC, Asheville, NC; and T. W. R. Wallis and D. S. Arndt
Manuscript (304.3 kB)


Poster Session 3
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Short Range Forecasting
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
773
A convection permitting forecast ensemble for the mid-Atlantic states: applications for renewable energy
Brian J. Etherton, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and M. J. Parker and B. Weatherhead

Poster PDF (2.9 MB)

 
774
Solar and Wind Energy Forecasting and Projection
Quanhua (Mark) Liu, NOAA/NESDIS, Camp Sprins, MD; and F. Weng

 
775
Intra-hour forecasting with a total sky imager at the UC San Diego solar energy testbed
Bryan Urquhart, Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA; and C. W. Chow, M. Lave, J. Kleissl, and B. Washom

Poster PDF (1.5 MB)

 
776
Prototyping and Validating a Solar Irradiance Forecasting System
George D. Modica, AER, Inc, Lexington, MA; and R. P. D'Entremont, M. J. Iacono, G. B. Gustafson, and H. E. Snell

Poster PDF (351.9 kB)

 
777
Creation of a WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Forecasts at Turbine Height
Adam J. Deppe, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; and W. A. Gallus Jr. and E. S. Takle
Manuscript (488.6 kB)

Poster PDF (899.2 kB)

 
778
Improving the 0-3 hour wind forecast through wind farm data assimilation in the NCAR/ATEC WRF RTFDDA
William Y. Y. Cheng, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and Y. Liu, Y. Liu, B. Mahoney, M. Politovich, T. T. Warner, K. Parks, and J. Himelic

 
779
Probabilistic Wind Vector Forecasting using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging
McLean Sloughter, Seattle Univ., Seattle, WA; and T. Gneiting and A. E. Raftery

 
780
Verification and analysis of hub-height wind forecasts from the NCAR-Xcel WRF-RTFDDA
Gregory Roux, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and Y. Liu, M. J. Pocernich, W. Y. Y. Cheng, L. Delle Monache, A. Fournier, S. Linden, and W. Myers

 
781
Evaluation of wind ramp forecasts from an initial version of a rapid update dynamical-statistical ramp prediction system
John W. Zack, AWS Truepower, LLC, Troy, NY; and S. H. Young and E. J. Natenberg

 
782
Application Of An Operational Meso-Scale Modelling System For Industiral Plant Energy Operations
Anthony P. Praino, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; and L. A. Treinish, D. Pinckney, and R. Calio

Poster PDF (8.0 MB)

 
783
Observations and downscaled predictions of effects of land use and urban heat island on climate
Benjamin J. Hatchett, DRI, Reno, NV; and D. Koracin, J. T. Abatzoglou, S. D. Bassett, and M. Dolloff

 
784
Numerical weather forecast with variational data assimilation in the Andes
Estatio J. Gutiérrez, City College of New York, New York, NY; and A. Muñoz


Poster Session 4
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Medium/Long Range Forecasting
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
785
An Analysis of Climate Change's Impacts on Future Wind Energy Production in California
David M. Rasmussen Jr., Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; and T. Holloway and G. F. Nemet

 
786
Using long range forecasts to assess hydro potential
Michael Ferrari, Coca Cola, Bethlehem, PA

 
787
The Impact of Climate Change on Renewable Energy Production across the United States: An Illustrative Study using The Renewable Energy Network Optimization Tool (ReNOT)
Randall Alliss, Northrop Grumann Corporation, Chantilly, VA; and R. Link, H. Kiley, D. Apling, G. Higgins, and K. Darmenova

Poster PDF (1.5 MB)

 
788
Climate change implications of summer coastal cooling on energy demands over US
B. Lebassi, College of New York, New York, NY; and J. E. Gonzalez, O. Rhone, and R. Bornstein

 
790
Numerical Simulations of a Summer 2010 Heat Wave in New York City using WRF's Building Energy Parameterization
Estatio J. Gutiérrez, City College of New York, New York, NY; and J. E. González, R. D. Bornstein, M. Arend, and A. Martilli

Poster PDF (921.9 kB)


Poster Session 5
Renewable Energy: Unintended Consequences??
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
791
Effects of wind turbine wakes on micrometeorological conditions over a crop canopy
Lars Mattison, South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD; and D. A. Rajewski, E. S. Takle, J. L. Hatfield, and J. H. Prueger

 
792
Characteristics of wind turbine wakes in an intensively managed agricultural area
Aaron J. Rosenberg, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; and J. K. Lundquist, A. J. Deppe, D. A. Rajewski, M. E. Rhodes, M. L. Aitken, and E. S. Takle

 
793
The impact of wind energy on weather: studies with a simplified model
Daniel Barrie, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD; and D. B. Kirk-Davidoff

 
794
Considering wildlife impacts in building the new energy economy
Justin Allegro, National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC; and A. Staudt and R. Curry


Poster Session 6
Weather, Climate and Policy: Issues for the New Energy Economy
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
795
Advanced nuclear power systems to mitigate climate change
Charles Archambeau, Science Council for Global Initiatives, Boulder, CO; and T. Blees, Y. Chang, R. J. Peterson, R. Serafin, J. Shuster, E. Velikhov, and R. Ware

Poster PDF (1.0 MB)

 
796
Calculating the carbon emissions associated with San Jose's Green Vision goals
Eugene Cordero, San Jose State Univ., San Jose, CA; and L. Prada


Poster Session 7
Special Topics in Weather, Climate and the New Energy Economy
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
 
798
Ensemble wind speed forecasting for a wind plant in British Columbia
Selena Katharine Farris, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; and M. Rucker, R. B. Stull, and H. Modzelewski

Poster PDF (7.8 MB)

 
799
Observed and simulated interactions between electricity consumption and urban surface air temperatures in downtown Tokyo and Osaka
Yukihiro Kikegawa, Meisei Univ., Tokyo, Japan; and Y. Ohashi, T. Ihara, and H. Kondo

 
800
Regional climate modeling and energy demand projections for selected Colorado sites
Glenn Higgins, Northrop Grumman Corporation, Chantilly, VA; and K. Darmenova, D. Apling, and H. Kiley

 
802
Solar Thermal Drinking Water Production: Weather Challenges and Climate Change
Hugo A. Loaiciga, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA

 
803
Development of low cost X-Band Radar for rain reflectivity measurements in the western region of Puerto Rico
Gianni Alexis Pablos, Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR; and J. G. Colom, J. Ortiz, S. Cruz-Pol, and J. Trabal

 
804
Analysis of solar radiation measurements for decentralized solar energy usage in the New York City metropolitan area
Beate G. Liepert, NWRA NorthWest Research Associates, Redmond, WA; and C. D. Klose

 
805
Wind ramp events at an Iowa wind farm: a climatology and evaluation of WRF ensemble forecast skill
William A. Gallus Jr., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA; and A. J. Deppe
Manuscript (741.1 kB)

Poster PDF (894.3 kB)

 
806
Improvement of a wind map over the Korean Peninsula based on mesoscale model WRF
Young-Jean Choi, National Institute of Meteorological Research, Seoul, South Korea; and J. Y. Byon and B. K. Seo

 
808
Automatic Wind Turbine Detection Using Level-II Data
B. L. Cheong, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and R. D. Palmer and S. M. Torres

Poster PDF (11.5 MB)

 
809
The effects of varying meteorological conditions on power production at a central North American wind farm
Brian Joseph Vanderwende, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO; and J. K. Lundquist

Poster PDF (454.9 kB)

 
810
A comparison of turbine-based and farm-based methods for converting wind to power
Julia M. Pearson, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and G. Wiener, B. Lambi, and W. Myers
Manuscript (444.5 kB)

Poster PDF (957.4 kB)


Formal Poster Viewing with Coffee Break

4:00 PM-5:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Recording files available
Joint Session 9
Weather and Climate Applications for Energy Decision Support—II
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; and the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences )
Chair: Mitchell T. Baer, Dept. of Energy
  4:15 PM
J9.1A
NASA's Prediction of Worldwide Energy Resource (POWER) Web services
William S. Chandler, SSAI, Hampton, VA; and J. M. Hoell, D. Westberg, C. H. Whitlock, T. Zhang, and P. W. Stackhouse Jr.
  4:30 PM
J9.2
The Wind ENergy Data and Information (WENDI) Gateway: New information and analysis tools for wind energy stakeholders
Dale Kaiser, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN; and G. Palanisamy, S. Santhana-Vannan, Y. Wei, T. Smith, M. Starke, B. Wilson, and L. Wibking
  4:45 PM
J9.3
Estimation of confidence intervals for wind forecasts
Robert Mureau, Meteo Group, Wageningen, Netherlands

  5:00 PM
J9.4
Nobody Lives at the Airport
Lawrence Heitkemper, MDA Information Systems LLC, Gaithersburg, MD; and D. D. Kirk-Davidoff, T. Hartman, and R. Haas
  5:15 PM
J9.6
From Coordination to Collaboration: Energy Meteorology and the Public-Private Value Chain
Steve Woll, WeatherFlow Inc., Poquoson, VA; and J. Titlow and D. Green

5:30 PM-6:30 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


Awards Banquet Reception in the Exhibit Hall

7:00 PM-10:00 PM: Wednesday, 26 January 2011


91st AMS Awards Banquet
Location: 6ABCD (Washington State Convention Center)

Thursday, 27 January 2011

8:00 AM-5:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Michio Yanai Symposium

Weather Video Preview Theater
Location: 303 (Washington State Convention Center)

8:30 AM-9:45 AM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 5
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Short Range Forecasting I
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Julie K. Lundquist, University of Colorado at Boulder
  8:30 AM
5.1
Public-Private Collaboration to Improve Wind Ramp Forecasts
Melinda Marquis, NOAA, Boulder, CO; and A. Stern and S. Calvert
  8:45 AM
5.2
  9:00 AM
5.3
Progress in NOAA hourly-updated model forecasting for renewable energy guidance
Stanley G. Benjamin, NOAA/ESRL/GSD, Boulder, CO; and J. M. Wilczak, J. M. Brown, M. Marquis, J. B. Olson, S. S. Weygandt, C. R. Alexander, and G. Dimego
  9:15 AM
5.4
Short-term wind-speed forecasting system for wind power applications
Justin Joseph Traiteur, Weather Central LP, Madison, WI; and S. Baidya Roy
  9:30 AM
5.5

9:30 AM-12:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Exhibit Hours

9:45 AM-11:00 AM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Formal Poster Viewing with Coffee Break

11:00 AM-12:15 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 6
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Short Range Forecasting II
Location: 6A (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Jennifer States, PNNL
  11:00 AM
6.1
  11:15 AM
6.2
Spatial and temporal variability of incoming solar irradiance at a measurement site in Hawai'i
Laura M. Hinkelman, JISAO/Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA; and R. George, S. Wilcox, and M. Sengupta
  11:30 AM
6.3
Observational targeting using ensemble sensitivity analysis to Improve short-term wind power forecasting in the Mid-Columbia Basin
Edward J. Natenberg, MESO, Inc., Troy, NY; and S. Young, G. Van Knowe, J. W. Zack, J. Manobianco, and C. Kamath
  11:45 AM
6.4
An overview of NCAR's advanced wind forecasting system for integrating wind resources into the new energy economy
David B. Johnson, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and B. Mahoney, Y. Liu, G. Wiener, W. Myers, and K. Parks
  12:00 PM
6.5
WindNET: An advanced wind sensor network to improve short-range wind forecasts for electric utility dispatch and operation
John Manobianco, AWS Truepower LLC, Albany, NY; and J. W. Zack, S. Young, D. Nakafuji, T. Aukai, L. Rogers, and L. Dangelmaier
Recording files available
Joint Session 8
Communicating Uncertainty (Themed Joint Session)
Location: 611 (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; and the Second Symposium on Environment and Health )
Chair: Manda Adams, Univ. of North Carolina
  11:15 AM
J8.2
User engagement for water resources forecasts: a framework for iterative communication
Kevin Werner, NOAA/NWS, Salt Lake City, UT; and K. Averyt and G. Owen
  11:45 AM
J8.4
Meaning, Context, and Weather-Related Information Sharing
Susan A. Jasko, California Univ. of Pennsylvania, California, PA; and C. M. Kauffman and P. Hettler
  12:00 PM
J8.5
Communicating Satellite MW Ocean Product Errors to a Variety of Users
Deborah K. Smith, Remote Sensing Systems, Santa Rosa, CA; and F. J. Wentz, K. Hilburn, and C. A. Mears

12:00 PM-1:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Lunch Break

12:15 PM-1:15 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session
Presidential Town Hall Meeting
Location: 6A (Washington State Convention Center)
Hosts: (Joint between the Events; the 14th Conference of Atmospheric Science Librarians International; the Town Hall Meetings; the Michio Yanai Symposium; the 27th Conference on Interactive Information Processing Systems (IIPS); the 25th Conference on Hydrology; the 24th Conference on Weather and Forecasting/20th Conference on Numerical Weather Prediction; the 23rd Conference on Climate Variability and Change; the 20th Symposium on Education; the 18th Conference on Planned and Inadvertent Weather Modification; the 16th Conference on Middle Atmosphere; the 15th Symposium on Integrated Observing and Assimilation Systems for the Atmosphere, Oceans and Land Surface (IOAS-AOLS); the 13th Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry; the Ninth Conference on Artificial Intelligence and its Applications to the Environmental Sciences; the Ninth History Symposium; the 8th Conference on Space Weather; the Seventh Annual Symposium on Future Operational Environmental Satellite Systems; the Sixth Symposium on Policy and Socio-economic Research; the Fifth Conference on the Meteorological Applications of Lightning Data; the 5th Symposium on Lidar Atmospheric Applications; the Fourth Annual CCM Forum; the Third Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions; the Second Aviation, Range and Aerospace Meteorology Special Symposium on Weather-Air Traffic Management Integration; the Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy; the Second Symposium on Environment and Health; the First Conference on Transition of Research to Operations: Successes, Plans and Challenges; the Special Symposium on Advances in Modeling and Analysis Using Python; the More Effectively Communicating the Science of Tropical Climate and Tropical Cyclones; and the Special Symposium on Applications of Air Pollution Meteorology )

Ralph Cicerone, head of the National Academy of Sciences, will provide a take-home message on what the scientific community in general and the AMS community in particular can do to increase their credibility with the public. Cicerone has been thinking deeply about how the practice of science and the behavior of individual scientists can be improved. As much as listening, communication is based on some level of trust. And, just as the Tuesday event should provide a teachable moment about how we influence our environment, the ”Climategate” e-mails were a teachable moment about human frailty being a part of the practice of science. The current political climate has been reinforced by Climategate and by a few errors in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) report, damaging the trust the public feels not only in climate science, but also toward science in general. Viewing this in a positive manner, provides an incentive to redouble the efforts of all scientists in promoting ethical professional conduct and improving the way the business of science is done and the manner in which scientific findings are communicated to the public. For additional information on the 2011 Presidential Town Hall, please contact AMS President Peggy LeMone (e-mail: amspresident@ametsoc.org).
  12:15 PM
Ensuring Integrity in the Doing and Using of Science
Ralph Cicerone, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC

12:15 PM-1:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Michio Yanai Symposium Luncheon
Location: 4C-1 (Washington State Convention Center)

1:30 PM-2:00 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 7A
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Short Range Forecasting III
Location: 6A (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Cegeon J. Chan, MIT
  1:30 PM
7A.1
Overview of the eastern Washington wind energy study
Larry K. Berg, PNNL, Richland, WA; and J. D. Fast, R. K. Newsom, M. Pekour, W. J. Shaw, C. A. Finley, and J. R. McCaa
  1:45 PM
7A.2
Do More Sophisticated Models Improve the Accuracy of Wind Resource Estimates?
Philippe Beaucage, AWS Truepower LLC, Albany, NY; and J. Manobianco and M. Brower

1:30 PM-3:00 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 7B
Continuation of Dollars and Cents: Weather for Energy Markets and Weather Fundamentals for Energy Planning: Data and User Groups
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Melinda Marquis, NOAA
  1:30 PM
7B.1
Does it matter to the atmosphere where wind farms are located?
Amanda S. Adams, Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC
  1:45 PM
7B.2
Solar resource maps for renewable energy
Ray George, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO; and M. Sengupta and S. Wilcox
  2:00 PM
7B.3
New wind energy resource potential estimates for the United States
Dennis Elliott, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO; and M. Schwartz, S. Haymes, D. Heimiller, G. Scott, M. Brower, E. Hale, and B. Phelps

Poster PDF (4.5 MB)

  2:15 PM
7B.4
Assessment of the gross U.S. offshore wind energy potential
Marc Schwartz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO; and D. Heimiller and S. Haymes
Manuscript (760.9 kB)

  2:30 PM
7B.5
Optimal unit commitment and dispatch for wind farm operations
Jay Mashburn, IBM, Mansfield, TX; and J. Bloom, J. R. Kalagnanam, and L. A. Treinish
  2:45 PM
7B.6

2:00 PM-3:00 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 8
Supply/Demand Fundamentals: Medium/Long Range Forecasting
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Jerry H. Crescenti, Iberdrola Renewables
  2:00 PM
8.1
The impact of anthropogenic global warming on the United States wind resource
Daniel Barrie, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD; and D. B. Kirk-Davidoff
  2:15 PM
8.2
Seasonal forecasting for wind energy applications
Jeffrey M. Freedman, AWS Truewind LLC, Albany, NY; and L. Fusina, M. Brower, and J. Manobianco
  2:30 PM
8.3
500mb Synoptic Precursors for Severe Cold in the Midwest/Northeast U.S
Kristen Guirguis, SIO/Univ. Of California, La Jolla, CA; and A. Gershunov and S. Bennett
  2:45 PM
8.4
Climate change, hurricane risk to energy systems, and implications for the new energy economy
Seth D. Guikema, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD; and S. M. Quiring and R. Nateghi

3:00 PM-3:05 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Registration Closes

3:00 PM-3:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


Coffee Break

Meet the President

3:30 PM-4:30 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 9A
Renewable Energy: Unintended Consequences??
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Jan Kleissl, University of California, san diego
  3:45 PM
9A.2
Effect of wind turbine wakes on cropland surface fluxes in the US great plains during a nocturnal low level jet
Michael E. Rhodes, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO; and M. L. Aitken, J. K. Lundquist, E. S. Takle, and J. H. Prueger

  4:00 PM
9A.3
A WRF simulation of the effect of a large wind farm on 40 years of precipitation in the eastern United States
David B. Sherman, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; and B. Fiedler, M. S. Bukovsky, and A. S. Adams

3:30 PM-5:00 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 9B
Supply/Demand Funds: Short-Range Forecasting IV
Location: 4C-2 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Justin Sharp, Sharply Focused LLC
  3:45 PM
9B.2
Lidar measurements of wind flow characteristics for inland and offshore Wind Eenergy
Yelena L. Pichugina, CIRES/Univ. of Colorado and NOAA/ESRL, Boulder, CO; and R. M. Banta, R. M. Hardesty, and W. A. Brewer
  4:00 PM
9B.3
Kalman filter, analog and wavelet postprocessing in the NCAR-Xcel operational wind-energy forecasting system
Luca Delle Monache, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and A. Fournier, T. M. Hopson, Y. Liu, B. Mahoney, G. Roux, and T. Warner
  4:15 PM
9B.4
Statistical Analysis of intra-farm microscale wind characteristics at selected Xcel wind farms
Yuewei Liu, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and Y. Liu, W. Cheng, G. Wiener, B. Lambi, and B. Mahoney
  4:30 PM
9B.5
An Investigation into the Spatiotemporal Scale of Two Wind Ramp Events in Northeastern Colorado
Theresa A. Aguilar, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and Y. Liu, Y. Liu, and B. Mahoney

  4:45 PM
9B.6
Wind energy forecasting with the NCAR RTFDDA and ensemble RTFDDA systems
Yubao Liu, NCAR, Boulder, CO; and W. Y. Y. Cheng, G. Roux, Y. Liu, L. Delle Monache, M. Pocernich, B. Kosovic, T. M. Hopson, A. Bourgeois, G. Wiener, T. Warner, B. Mahoney, and D. B. Johnson

4:30 PM-5:00 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011

Recording files available
Session 10
Weather, Climate and Policy: Issues for the New Energy Economy
Location: 4C-4 (Washington State Convention Center)
Host: Second Conference on Weather, Climate, and the New Energy Economy
Chair: Melinda Marquis, NOAA
  4:30 PM
10.1
Are Policies to Encourage Wind Energy Predicated on a Misleading Statistic?
Kevin F. Forbes, Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC; and M. Stampini and E. Zampelli
  4:45 PM
10.2
The need to go slow with renewable energy development
William M. Gray, Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO

5:00 PM-5:05 PM: Thursday, 27 January 2011


AMS 91st Annual Meeting Adjourns